A Multicultural World

**日本語訳は下をご覧ください**
“My father is Mexican and my mother is Japanese. Growing up in Mexico, some people would call me Chinita, which actually means Chinese. Aside from that, I never really experienced any discrimination because of my heritage.

Although my whole life, there was this nagging feeling that I wasn’t completely Mexican.

“As a kid, my grandmother would record TV shows in Japan then send video tapes to us because there was no internet back then. So when I got older, I decided to live in Japan to find and develop this side of myself.

“Tokyo is great because I can find people who are half-Japanese and half something else, just like me. My research on Nikkei communities or Japanese descendants in Latin America has helped me connect with fellow bilingual Japanese and Spanish speakers, which defines my identity. One of my mentors is Argentinian but has Japanese roots. He’s lived here for 25 years and is an expert on second or third generation Japanese communities. We switch back and forth to Japanese and Spanish.

“I guess I’m trying to focus on the relationship between language and identity. It’s interesting to see people who move a lot learn how to adapt to their surroundings. You open your mind to everything that’s there because it’s part of your survival. And that means your identity changes, depending on the context of where you are. What you say changes, too, depending on who you’re talking to. It’s really interesting to be part of this multicultural world.”

_DSC2488.jpg
At the entrance of Nogi Park

「父はメキシコ人で、母は日本人。メキシコでは『チニータ(正確には中国人の意)』と呼ばれて育った。それ以外には、この境遇のせいで差別を経験したことはないわ。それでも、自分は完璧なメキシコ人ではないという気持ちに常につきまとわれてきた。子どものころはまだインターネットがなくて、祖母が日本のテレビ番組を録画したビデオテープを送ってくれていたの。そうして大きくなったわたしは、日本に住むことを決めた。自分の中の日本人をきちんと見つけて、はっきりさせたかった。

東京はすごいところよ。わたしのような日本人とのハーフがすぐ見つかるんだから。南米の『日系』人コミュニティや日本人を祖先に持つ人たちを対象にリサーチを行って、日本語とスペイン語の両方を話す仲間たちとつながることができた。この二か国語の話者である、ということがわたしのアイデンティティーを定義づけているの。わたしのメンターにアルゼンチン人がいるのだけど、彼も日本にルーツを持つひとり。日本に25年も住んでいて、二世や三世によるコミュニティにとても詳しいエキスパートなの。彼は、日本語とスペイン語を自在に切り替えながら話すのよ。

わたしは、言語とアイデンティティーとの関係にフォーカスしようとしているんだと思う。移住を重ねてきた人たちが、どうやって周囲に順応していくかを観察するのはとても興味深いわ。新しい土地の何もかもに心を開かなければ、生きてはいけない。そしてそれは、自分のいる土地のコンテクスト*によって、アイデンティティーが変化することを意味しているの。あなたの話すことだって、相手によって変化するわ。この多文化世界の一部でいられることは本当におもしろいことなのよ」

*言語学において、コミュニケーションを成立させる共有情報のこと。

【翻訳:Junko Kato Asaumi】

_DSC2444.jpg
In front of Nogizaka Station

Rare Experience

**日本語訳は下をご覧ください**
“Elderly Japanese women
seem to have taken a liking to me. One dark and rainy day, a sweet old lady waved to me and said, ‘Come inside the umbrella or you’ll catch a cold.’ Then another time, while I was staring at the moon by myself to wait for the lunar eclipse, some middle-aged woman approached me and said, Tsuki ga kirei desu ne (the moon is beautiful). We ended up watching the eclipse together and chatting about life.

“Those tiny thoughtful things touch my heart. The second lady even invited me to her house. When they feel like they can trust you, they really welcome you. I love their hospitality. Maybe it’s because I speak Japanese so I don’t really feel any boundaries or wall with them. They respect that you can understand their language and culture.

Being Indonesian in Japan, I feel lucky but it’s also challenging at the same time.

“Good thing I don’t feel any discrimination at the Japanese company I work for. The only downside is I get passed over for assignments overseas or business trips because of visa requirements, whereas a Japanese colleague can go on the fly.

“Fortunately, Japan makes huge investments in Indonesia, which is my territory. It’s always my time to shine wherever there’s an Indonesia-related project. I get to meet government officials and even the Japanese ambassador. It’s a rare experience and privilege to be working here. As a foreigner in Japan, you have a lot of skills that people value—language, your open mind, etc. I think it’s a plus if you live in Japan.”

DSC_0499.jpg
Italian Park in Shiodome, Tokyo

「わたし、どうやら日本のおばちゃんたちに好かれるみたいなの。あるどんよりした雨の日、親切なおばあさんがわたしに手招きしてこう言ったわ。『わたしの傘にお入りなさい、風邪ひいちゃうわよ』って。また別の日、わたしは月食を待ってひとりで月を眺めていた。すると中年女性が近づいてきて、『月がきれいですね』って話しかけてきたの。わたしたちはそれから月食を最後まで一緒に観て、人生についておしゃべりもした。

こういった思いやりの込もった小さな出来事たちが、わたしの心を温めてくれるの。月食を一緒に観た女性は、なんとわたしを自宅に招いてもくれた。信頼できる人だと思ってもらえたら、心からもてなしてくれる。わたしはそんな彼女たちのホスピタリティが大好きなの。何の境界も壁も感じないのは、わたしが日本語を話せるせいかもしれない。日本語と日本文化をきちんと理解していれば、その姿勢を尊重してくれるんだと思うわ。

在日インドネシア人としては、自分を幸運だと思う。けれど同時に苦労だってある。良いことは、わたしの職場は日本の会社だけれど何の差別も感じないこと。唯一の悪いことは、ビザの問題で海外業務や海外出張から外されてしまうこと。日本人の同僚たちは難なく行けるのにね。

幸運なことに、日本はわたしのテリトリーであるインドネシアに巨額の投資をしてくれている。そしてインドネシア関連のプロジェクトがあれば、今度はわたしの出番。官僚に会う機会もあれば、大使に会えることすらある。これは貴重な体験だし、ここで働いていることを光栄に思う。日本に住む外国人なら、人々が評価してくれるスキルはたくさん持っているはず。例えば言語能力だったり、先入観や偏見を持たない広い心だったりね。日本に住むとしたら、こういったことがプラスになってくるわ。」
【翻訳:Junko Kato Asaumi】
DSC_0459.jpg

The Little Things in Life

**日本語訳は以下**

“When I say I’m from Macedonia, people associate me with macadamia nuts. We play this game of ‘Where is it?’ Some think it’s Mesopotamia. At least older people get it. But then comes the awkward silence once first impressions are out of the way. Whatever you do though, it’s important to represent well. Because people see you as an ambassador of your country, whether you play the role or not. Your actions will reflect on folks back home. It’s a weight we all carry when we’re abroad. Especially when you’re from a small country and people haven’t met many of you.

“The funny thing about me being in Japan is that my good Japanese friend is in my hometown. She’s there to study, I’m here to study. We both wanted to get out of our own countries because it’s suffocating to live in just one place. It’s so limiting like a cage. She finds more freedom the farther she is from the system that brought her up. And I find more personal freedom here. I guess we’re both looking for inspiration, for something new—a different life.

“What I love about Japan is the extraordinary beauty of ordinary things. The things you use everyday, stuff around you that you don’t really think or care about, have aesthetic beauty. You go to a bakery and the bread has some design or it’s shaped like a cute animal. Package design is a big deal here. For example, there’s this chocolate that I really like, which I bought because of its beautiful box. It would be tasty anyway, even if it was wrapped in something plain. But presentation makes it something out of the ordinary. Even manhole covers have an artistic look and feel to them. They have intricate designs and symbols engraved on them. These small things make this otherwise stressful life somewhat enjoyable.”

DSC_0625.jpg
at Tokyo Midtown

日常に隠れた小さなもの

マケドニア出身って聞くと、どうやらマカダミアナッツを連想する人が多いみたいです。そんな時私は「マケドニアはどこだ?」ってゲームを始めるんです。お年寄りは正解を知っていることが多いけど、中には「メソポタニアだ」っていう人もいます。でも、一度印象が悪い方向に向かってしまうと、そこに気まずい沈黙が流れ始めます。だからどんな方法を使ってでも、私たちは自分の国をうまく紹介することが大切だと思うんです。だって、あなたがその役割を果たすかどうかに関わらず、人はあなたをその国の代表として見ているから。自分が取った行動が、自分の国の人々の印象を左右するんです。それは海外に滞在している間みんなが背負う責任のようなものだけれど、マケドニアのように小さな国出身でめずらしがられるような人なら、なおさら重いんです。

私が日本にいるのが不思議に思えることの一つに、私の仲の良い日本人の友人がマケドニアにいるということがあります。彼女は勉強するためにマケドニアにいることを決めて、私は勉強するために日本にいることを決めました。私たちはきっと、同じ場所に住み続けることの息苦しさから抜け出したかったんだと思います。だって、それはまるでケージの中にいるように限られた世界だから。私の友人は、彼女が育った環境から離れれば離れるほど自由が感じられるということに気がついたようです。私は私で、ここにいるほうが私らしくいられるということに気がつきました。きっと私たちは、何か新しいインスピレーションが欲しかったんだと思います。人生を変えるような何かが。

日本の好きなところは、”日常に非常の美しさがある”ことです。毎日使うようなものだったり、気にも留めないようなものだったりに審美的な美を感じるんです。パン屋に行けば、そこに並んでいるパンさえもきれいにデザインされていたり、かわいい動物の形になっていたりするでしょう。それから、ここではパッケージもすごく重要。例えば、私の大好きなチョコレートがあるんですけど、実はパッケージがかわいくて選んだんです。普通の紙で包まれてたって、味は変わらずおいしいはずないんですけどね。でも、こんな風に演出されたチョコは普通じゃなくなっちゃうんです。マンホールにさえも芸術を感じます。日本のマンホールは、細かくデザインされているだけじゃなくその地域のシンボルも彫刻されています。そんな日常に隠れた小さな物事が、どちらかというとストレスの多い毎日の生活を、こんな風に楽しいものに変えてくれるんだと思います。

(翻訳:Loving Life in Tokyo

Living Between Two Worlds

**日本語訳は下の方ご覧ください**

“I wrote a lot about the interaction of language, humans, and society in what became my first book. I think these ideas are what constitutes a big part of my experience here in Japan. When you learn a second language it is like you have a second soul. It is like you build a second part of you, which is what I think did since I came to Japan.

“I spent a good two years on the badminton club, and I basically had to be the only foreigner amongst Japanese people. Naturally at the start I think most of us want to be a part of the culture we are living in, and that is what I tried really hard to do.

Me being a lady added an additional level to the complexity to the social situation I was in. I didn’t just have to be a Japanese person I had to be a Japanese lady.

“What that meant was I had to learn to speak in a similar tone to the others, talk about the things they talk about, act like they do. I was spending over twenty hours a week with my team while at the same time I am part of an all English taught undergraduate program. For one part of my life I was in English mode and for the other I was in Japanese mode. It was like a split personality living between the two worlds.

“I am also interested in the attitude of people towards language and what people think the common language should be. In English we accept a plurality of ways to speak the language, but in Japan people are pretty mono-centric about languages, most people believe there is one standard that everyone has to follow. Everything else beyond that is not Japanese. It is interesting that the idea of language standardization is in part a constructed belief that was started in the early 1800s. Now because of media and print, people have started to see the language as a symbol of the national identity.”

(Her first book published in Japanese can be purchased online at https://www.amazon.co.jp/dp/4005008526)

Editors Note: This is the first post featuring both English and Japanese. In the future we will continue to publish in both languages when the time and resources permits.”

_D3S4622

日本語訳:

「今年の四月に出版された自分の初著書にて、ことば、人間と社会との関係について、色々と語りました。来日してから4年間を経て、言葉と人間、また、言葉と社会などの密な関係をいろんな場面で体験し、それが自分の留学生活を形作る大きなきっかけとなりました。第二言語(いわゆる「外国語」)を学ぶにつれ、新たな自分が生み出されると信じています。日本に来てから、さらにそう確信できました。

「大学の体育会(自分の大学では「運動会」と呼ばれますが)バドミントン部に2年間ほど所属しておりました。周りの部員はほとんど日本人でした。そういった環境で、正直に言うと初めは必死に「日本人っぽく」なろうとしていました。特に、女性である以上、周りに受け入れてもらうために、周りの人々が持つ女らしさのイメージに従うのに精一杯でした。話し方も、話題も、自分の振る舞いまで適応しようとしていました。部活の仲間とは平均週20時間を一緒に過ごし、残りの時間は留学生のコミュニティにおり、日本語モードと英語モードとの切り替えを常に意識して生活していました。

「人が言語に対してどういう風に意識するのか、また、グローバル化が進む中、共通言語(いわゆる「リンガフランカ」)を何語にすべきなのか、といった社会言語学の様々な方面に携わる課題について興味を持っています。例えば、一つの言語において多様性を認めるかどうかというと、英語はそうであり、日本語はそうではないと思います。日本では、誰にでもある標準に従うことを求める傾向があると思います。標準語であれ、方言であれ、そういったスタンダード以外のものは、ピュアな日本語だと認められないみたいです。19世紀に明治時代から国語の標準化を始め、言語の「標準」という社会的構成概念が生まれ、言語そのものが国あるいは国民性の象徴だと考えられていることが興味深いと思います。」

Studying Abroad

Why did you pick Japan?

“We’re here on a one-year student exchange program. I’m a linguist. I came to Japan because I thought Japanese is interesting to learn. I took Japanese 4 years ago now and I just like the language. I speak five – Italian, French, English, Spanish and Japanese.”

“I’m studying Japanese in France, where I’m from. So in order to improve my level I guess it was better to come to Japan. I’m really in love with the history, especially the medieval one like the Sengoku jidai, this period of Japan. Also, I love all the culture, especially the traditional ones like geisha and special events like hanami (cherry-blossom viewing). They’re so different from what we have back home in France.”

“It’s weird because sometimes you go to some places and everything is different from Europe, from Western culture. But then you realize it’s not that different. It’s weird because you have both. So the culture, the way people behave, is really different; the way of thinking. But on the other hand, there are similarities which make you feel that the world isn’t so big. For instance, you’re here in Tokyo but you can find Italian things or French things even if we are on the opposite side of the planet.”

Kindred Spirits

“I’m quarter Japanese and I never suspected that I had Japanese in me at all till my mom told me so when I was 8. She thought it was way too freaky that I was so into Japan, the language, its poetry and music. I really like words. And Japanese is a really beautiful language; the way it flows is even kind of melodic. I also feel a little bit more connected to the Japanese attitude towards work and the group mentality. Like I tend to think a lot more about what other people are feeling. And I can center myself around that, like how this is going to make that person feel. I feel like that’s a natural aspect of Japanese culture. But I guess one downside is overthinking about how what I do is going to affect how someone feels and then it ends up being a situation where I could’ve gotten farther ahead or been less nervous about work if I would’ve just been `I don’t care what they think’. In America it’s cool to have that attitude. Although I’ve started to get some of that, initially I was very shy and not as outspoken as I am now. So that’s one of the things that drew me to Japan.”

Autumn01.jpg
Omotesando

Bridging Japan to the Outside World

“After teaching English in Japan for a year I decided to try my luck into stuff like media, event planning and food, because who doesn’t love food. I found a cool company that shared my vision of creating a community and catering to an international audience. They own a lot of restaurants in Tokyo and have like 80 different brands. Wired Cafe is one of them. I do PR, event planning and translation to help them internationalize, especially with the coming of the Olympics. Right now we’re working on a hotel where we can connect overseas guests with locals or people who know Japan so well they can show you places you won’t find in a guidebook. I’m hoping this job can give me a lot of opportunities and a lot of freedom to change that whole ‘foreigner bubble thing’, where foreigners can work and live in Japan but in the end it’s really hard to enter society fully. This job in particular could be a way to bring more into a better environment and create a space for both Japanese people and foreigners who would come. That’s been my thing.”Autumn03.jpg
Being a Foreigner in Japan

“I love Japan and I love living here. It’s super safe, comfortable, and food is amazing. But as a foreigner here, while considering the fact that I’ve studied for 6 years and I know people who have lived here for like 15 years (some even married to someone who’s Japanese), some people would still be like ‘Oh you can use chopsticks’ and ‘Oh konnichiwa, you have such good Japanese’. You know you’re an outsider if you don’t look Japanese. And people will always ask you `When are you going home?’ And that’s why I don’t see myself living here forever. To be sure, I enjoy Japan and I enjoy it now. But I think as a foreigner that’s something that is difficult here.”