Bouncing Back

**日本語訳は下をご覧ください**
“When I was 17, I had brain surgery for pituitary tumor. Luckily, it was benign. But it affected my day-to-day life. Before, I was very active in sports, like soccer, and was basically a jock, even though I don’t look like it. My memory also got messed up. I don’t remember certain things in my life that I’m sure I could recall prior to the operation. Worse, I would get seizures if I’m in the shower for more than five minutes. These episodes lasted for about five years. Then when I came to Japan at age 26, it started affecting me again because of the cold weather. By then all the seizures were supposed to be gone already. But with all the weather changes from different seasons, my body got confused.

“I come from Guam, a small island that’s a U.S. territory. I was here originally to study but things didn’t work out so I took a gamble and decided to live here anyway. My dad’s Japanese while mom’s Chamorro (native of Guam) and I wanted to see if I can fit in with the other side of my culture.

I started working at an izakaya (Japanese bar restaurant), which was a nightmare. The staff picked on me and the manager would punch me in the stomach whenever I made a mistake.

“I quit after three months. Then I became a contract employee for a haken place (temporary staffing agency), testing software for PCs. It opened my eyes to the harsh reality of non-regular, part-time employment system in Japan. It’s puzzling because all the rules are different. You’re part of the company but you’re not. They don’t really care about you. I did pretty good but the company was downsizing so of course they let us go.

“Today, I finally found a company where I feel at home and more appreciated. They look after me while I look out for them. I’ve also made some really good friends at work. So I’m happy. They’re very supportive and considerate of my health situation. I used to be dispatched to clients for onsite support. But now they give me more back-end, internal assignments. I’m more active giving ideas to management, spearheading projects, and equipping engineers with tools they need because I’ve been an engineer for a long time myself. I know the ins and outs.”_DSC3205.jpg
僕は17歳の時脳腫瘍で手術を受けた。幸いなことに良性腫瘍だったけど、日常生活には少なからず影響があった。手術をする前は特にサッカーが好きで、この見た目からは想像できないかもしれないけど、本当にスポーツばかりしていたんだ。それから少しずつ僕の記憶もごちゃごちゃになるようになった。手術前には思い出せていたことが思い出せない。5分以上シャワーを浴びていたら発作が起こってしまう可能性がある。そんなことが5年ぐらい続いた。そして26歳で日本に来てから、寒さのせいでまたそういうことが起こるようになった。それまでにはもう発作は起こらなくなっているはずだったのに。でも四季による天候の変化に体がついていかなかったんだ。

僕はグアム出身だ。元々は勉強するために来日したんだけど、あまりうまくいかなかった。でもちょっとギャンブルしてみようと思って、このまま日本に住むことに決めたんだ。僕の父は日本人で母はチャモロ(グアムの先住民)。果たして僕は日本の文化に馴染めるのかどうか知りたかったんだ。最初は居酒屋で働き始めたんだけど、最低だったよ。スタッフは僕をいじってくるし、ミスをすればマネージャーに腹をパンチされた。3ヶ月で辞めたよ。その後は派遣社員としてパソコンのソフトウェアをテストしたりする仕事に就いた。そこで日本の非正規社員の雇用制度の厳しい現実を目の当たりにした。ルールや規則が違いすぎて頭が混乱した。社員は会社の一部であって一部でない。会社は僕たちのことなんて気にしてはいないんだ。僕はいい仕事をしていたと思うけど、会社が人員削減を始めたものだからもちろん僕たちも会社を離れることになった。

そうしてやっと今の居心地の良い、常に感謝が感じられる会社を見つけたんだ。お互いを助け合いながら仕事ができる。この会社でとても良い友達にも出会えたし、本当に幸せだよ。僕の体のことも心配して気にかけてくれる。これまではクライアントのサポートに出向くような仕事が多かったんだけど、今は会社内部での仕事を任せてもらえるようになった。経営陣にアイディアを出したり、プロジェクトを先導したり、エンジニアとしての経験が長かったから彼らに必要なツールを提供することなんかにも携わるんだ。僕に任せてくれって感じだよ。

【翻訳:Tomomi Yuri

Talkin’ Loud

**日本語訳は下にあります**
“I’m from Madrid
 and I came to Japan to work as a journalist. My first week was pretty hard. I got depressed. Maybe it was jet lag or not being able to speak the language. At first I was afraid of human interaction, ‘What if they didn’t understand me?’ ‘What if we couldn’t even communicate?’ I was excited about visiting Japan because it’s always been my lifelong dream. So, I didn’t want to get a bad first impression due to my mood. I didn’t want to ruin my first experience of Japan. I had heard from people who lived here before claiming it’s a lonely country. One Spanish girl even packed her bags and went back home because she couldn’t stand the loneliness. So I stayed in my apartment and didn’t go out for the first couple of days.

“But once I got over my fears and started exploring the city, I realized how wrong I was. People are nice, polite, and willing to help even if you don’t understand each other. Plus we share some similarities. Izakaya (Japanese pub) food is a lot like tapas. Spanish people are loud, I’m loud and all my friends are, too. The Japanese speak very loud at restaurants and even shout when ordering. They forget all the social pressures of life while they’re out drinking. They’re more relaxed, which is similar to people in Spain, and that makes me feel at home. Of course, there’s the excessive drinking after a long day at work. Because of this, it’s normal to see drunk people lying on the streets of Tokyo. But people are so used to it, nobody cares anymore. It’s sad to see others pass them by without giving a hand.

“Still, life here is good. I mean I’ve only been in Tokyo for over a month, but already I feel like I could live here for the rest of my life.”

私はスペインのマドリード出身です。ジャーナリストとして日本に来ました。最初の1週間は本当に大変で、ひどく落ち込みました。時差ボケだったからなのか、言葉が通じなかったからなのか。最初は人と関わることが怖かったんです。もし誰も私のことをわかってくれなかったらどうする?もしコミュニケーショさえもできなかったら?日本に来ることがとても楽しみだったのに。人生における夢だったのに。だから私のムードが悪いということだけで人に悪い印象を与えるなんてしたくなかったし、初めての日本での生活を台無しにしたくはありませんでした。日本に住んだ経験がある人には、日本は孤独な国だって聞いていました。スペイン人のある女の子は孤独に耐えられず国に帰ってしまったそうです。それで私も最初の数日間は自分のアパートに閉じこもっていたんです。

DSC_1320
Harajuku’s Cat Street

そんな不安を乗り越えて色んなところに出かけ始めると、家に閉じこもっていることがいかに間違っていたかってことに気が付きました。人々は親切だし、礼儀正しいし、言葉が通じなくても手を貸してくれようとしてくれる。それに、日本とスペインには共通点がたくさんあったんです。まず、居酒屋メニューはスペインのタパスと同じようなものですよね。それに、スペイン人はうるさい。私はうるさいし、私の友だちもうるさい。居酒屋にいる日本人も同じです。大声で会話しているし、注文する時はもはや叫んでいるでしょう。お酒の場では社会的な立場や重圧を忘れてただ楽しんでいますよね。そんな時はみんなとてもリラックスしていて、スペイン人みたいなんです。それがまるで私が”ホーム”にいるような気持ちにさせてくれる。もちろん大変な仕事が終わった後で飲み過ぎることもあるけど。酔っ払った人が道端で横になっているのも普通ですよね。そしてみんな、そんなことには気も止めないぐらい慣れてしまってる。声もかけずに通り過ぎて行くのを見ると少し悲しくなります。

ここでの生活は好きです。まだ1ヶ月しか日本にいないのに、もう”一生ここで生活してもいいかもしれない”って感じているんです。【翻訳:Loving Life in Tokyo